Goal Selection for Counseling with Potentially Religious Clients by Professional and Student Counselors in Explicitly Christian or Secular Settings

Volume
Volume 11
Issue
Winter 1983
Title
Goal Selection for Counseling with Potentially Religious Clients by Professional and Student Counselors in Explicitly Christian or Secular Settings
Abstract

Research findings suggest that (a) "€œreligious"€ clients are less likely to benefit from counseling (more dropouts, less beneficial change) than "€œnonreligious"€ clients and (b) successful counseling usually results in value changes by clients. It was hypothesized that both of these findings might be due to secular and religious counselors setting different goals for potentially religious clients. In this study, counselors in explicitly Christian or secular settings, on professional or student levels (n=96), completed questionnaires rating their goals for a fictitious client who denied the importance of religion, ignored it, acknowledged it responsibly, or acknowledged it but acted bizarrely. The work setting accurately predicted the values of the counselors. Counselors, regardless of setting, responded differentially to clients who perceived the importance of religion differently. Christian counselors were significantly more concerned with spiritual issues and viewed spiritual goals as more important than did secular counselors. Findings suggest that, although both secular and Christian counselors are sensitive to perceptions of individual clients, the value system of the counselors will likely be reflected in the treatment goals they prefer.

Authors
Dr. E.L., Jr. Worthington and G.G. Scott
Pages
318 - 329
Price
Add to Cart $5.00