Dyadic Trust and Generalized Trust of Secular Versus Christian-College Students

Volume
Volume 12
Issue
Summer 1984
Title
Dyadic Trust and Generalized Trust of Secular Versus Christian-College Students
Abstract

It was correctly hypothesized that students at a conservative Christian college would be less trusting than secular-college students toward people in general (generalized trust), replicating Wrightsman (1964), but that Christian-college students would be higher in dyadic trust toward a dating partner than would be the case for students at a secular college. Differences in dyadic trust were smaller for more advanced states of courtship, suggesting that greater initial trust by Christians toward their religious partners accounted for the dyadic trust effect. Data from a religious subsample from the secular university supported the conclusions that the dyadic trust differences were associated with religiosity while the generalized trust differences were associated with selection of college. The results were also related to trust patterns for minority groups in general. The study illustrates the potential of using differences between prevailing Christian versus psychological conclusions to stimulate research contributions to psychology and to theology.

Author
Dr. R.E. Larzelere
Pages
119 - 124
Price
Add to Cart $5.00