Sin and Self-Functioning, Part 3: The Psychology and Ideology of Irrational Beliefs

Volume
Volume 16
Issue
Winter 1988
Title
Sin and Self-Functioning, Part 3: The Psychology and Ideology of Irrational Beliefs
Abstract

Irrational beliefs identified by Rational-Emotive theory (Ellis, 1962) as pathogenic were related to religious motivations and to orthodox beliefs having to do with sin. An extrinsic religious motivation and beliefs referring to the guilt of others appeared to predict problematic self-functioning. On the other hand, intrinsicness and beliefs about grace displayed complex linkages with irrational thinking and were also associated with less depression. A direct analysis of how subjects evaluated specific beliefs relative to their religious commitments suggested that positive correlations of intrinsicness and of grace with at least some irrational beliefs may not be indicative of true "€œirrationality."€ Instead, religious individuals may be reasoning from a world view that is ideologically incompatible with Rational Emotive theory.

Authors
Dr. P.J. Watson, R.J. Morris and Dr. R.W., Jr. Hood
Pages
348 - 361
Price
Add to Cart $5.00