Sin and Self-Functioning, Part 4: Depression, Assertiveness, and Religious Commitments

Volume
Volume 17
Issue
Spring 1989
Title
Sin and Self-Functioning, Part 4: Depression, Assertiveness, and Religious Commitments
Abstract

Intrinsic religiosity and a belief in grace were associated with emotional empathy, and grace was additionally predictive of less Personal Distress and depression. Earlier linkages of these variables with nonassertiveness were not replicated. One item from the Rathus (1973) Assertiveness Schedule and all of the Costello and Comrey (1967) Depression Scale were evaluated as relevant to religious commitments. Religious orientation, sin, and depression data from all eight samples of this series of studies were reexamined and clearly documented the interrelated nature of guilt and grace. Use of Allport and Ross (1967) scales to identify different religious types was also helpful in clarifying the relationship between sin and self-functioning. Overall, intrinsicness, Grace, and Self-Guilt seemed to operate within a more-or-less integrated matrix of orthodox perspectives that produced beneficial psychological effects.

Authors
Dr. P.J. Watson, Dr. R.W., Jr. Hood and R.J. Morris
Pages
44 - 58
Price
Add to Cart $5.00