Consistency with Clinical Experience Versus Sound Theory: A Response to Rosik

Volume
Volume 20
Issue
Fall 1992
Title
Consistency with Clinical Experience Versus Sound Theory: A Response to Rosik
Abstract

Psychoanalytic tradition of relating to an observing ego makes it unnecessary to conceptualize the Internal Self Helper as paranormal. It is not clear how Rosik conceptualizes the ISH with respect to theological considerations and expectations. Underlying assumptions he makes about the patient in his case study fit better with clinical experience and client self-report than with sound theory. How he views his patient is important, that is, whether she is seen as (a) separate selves, entities, "people," or alters in one body, or as (b) one whole person but with a fragmented sense of herself. The difference in viewpoints raises significant questions. There is danger in accepting a patient's self-report as literal truth, since (s)he may confuse functional with structural truth, thereby further confusing the clinical picture. Patients with abusive backgrounds are apt to internalize some of the abusive attitudes and negative feelings they experienced in their homes while growing up. Are the perceptions of an ISH held by Rosik's patient her own or those she believes her therapist holds or wants to hold? The ISH is an interesting but as yet not well defined or understood phenomenon which calls for ongoing integrative discussion in the professional community.

Author
C.M. Comstock
Pages
226 - 229
Price
Add to Cart $5.00