Religious Commitment, Attributional Style, and Gender as Predictors of Undergraduate Volunteer Behavior and Attitudes

Volume
Volume 27
Issue
Fall 1999
Title
Religious Commitment, Attributional Style, and Gender as Predictors of Undergraduate Volunteer Behavior and Attitudes
Abstract

One hundred twenty-two undergraduates attending a Jesuit university were surveyed concerning their religious commitment, belief in God control, attributional styles, and attitudes and behavior related to community service. Discriminant and multiple regression analyses indicated that scores on the God as Causal Agent scale (Ritzema & Young, 1983) and on the Powerful Others scale (Levenson, 1974) were significantly correlated with self-reported volunteer activity, with proservice attitudes, and with being identified as a community service volunteer by the university. Exploring gender differences revealed that religious commitment scores were correlated with Internality scores for males but not for females. In addition, the correlations between both God as Causal Agent and Internality (Levenson, 1974) scores and community service variables were significantly higher for male students than for female students. Findings suggest that research on altruism will benefit both by further exploring religious attribution and by examining possible moderator effects when investigating such relationships.

Author
Dr. F.M. Bernt
Pages
261 - 272
Price
Add to Cart $5.00