Christian Psychology Graduate School's Impact on Marriage: Nonstudent Spouses Speak

Volume
Volume 28
Issue
Fall 2000
Title
Christian Psychology Graduate School's Impact on Marriage: Nonstudent Spouses Speak
Abstract

Although many empirical studies have investigated marital distress and marital satisfaction, no research has been conducted on the impact of graduate school on marriage for students-in-training, particularly from the viewpoint of the nonstudent spouse. Using a qualitative research methodology, six male and six female spouses of third and fourth year graduate students at an APA-approved program in clinical psychology were subjects in the present study. Three hypotheses investigated were: (a) graduate training would have a detrimental effect on student marriages, (b) nonstudent spouses would report marital strain due to student spouses'€™ emotional isolation and withdrawal, and (c) due to the process of acculturation into organized secular psychology, students'€™ emphasis on personal religious faith would decrease. The first hypothesis was supported, the second was unsupported, and the third received mixed support. Three recommendations to support student marriages within graduate educational settings are offered in conclusion.

Authors
Dr. M.A. Legako and Dr. R.L. Sorenson
Pages
212 - 220
Price
Add to Cart $5.00