Are Psychology's Main Methods Biased Against the Worldview of Many Religious People?

Volume
Volume 34
Issue
Fall 2006
Title
Are Psychology's Main Methods Biased Against the Worldview of Many Religious People?
Abstract

This article examines some of the more problematic aspects of recent efforts to integrate psychology and religion. Specifically, many religious people-€”psychology's main consumer and client-€”make different assumptions than many psychologists about human nature and the world. This article attempts to explicate many of these conflicting assumptions, particularly as they affect psychological methods. Therapeutic and experimental methods are frequently viewed as theologically, if not philosophically, neutral to the subject matter they are investigating. This article aims to dispel this common myth. To discover or highlight these "hidden" assumptions of traditional methods, they are first contrasted to the assumptions of interpretive practices. However, interpretive practices are themselves often viewed as theologically neutral. Consequently, psychological methods are also compared to a theistic mode of inquiry that assumes that an active God is necessary to proper investigation.

Authors
Dr. B.D. Slife and Dr. M. Whoolery
Pages
217 - 231
Price
Add to Cart $5.00