Clinical Practice with Religious/Spiritual Issues: Niche, Proficiency or Specialty

Volume
Volume 36
Issue
Spring 2008
Title
Clinical Practice with Religious/Spiritual Issues: Niche, Proficiency or Specialty
Abstract

The process of specialty recognition in professional psychology has become increasingly formalized in recent years. The American Psychological Association (APA) now formally defines and recognizes specialties in psychology and organizations such as the American Board of Professional Psychology have repositioned themselves as specialist credentialing bodies. A process model of specialization is presented with increasing levels of specialization arranged from more generalized to more specialized as follows: nonspecialized general practice, niche practice, proficiency, and formal specialty practice. The distinction between de facto and de jure recognition of specialty practice is discussed. It is argued that clinical work with religious/ spiritual issues (RSI) already constitutes a practice niche and that numerous de facto proficiencies have been developed for this niche. The prospects and challenges for more formal specialty recognition of the domain of practice are discussed. The article concludes by briefly considering the relationship of "Christian counseling" to a possible formal specialty in clinical work with religious/spiritual issues.

Author
Dr. W.L. Hathaway
Pages
16 - 25
Price
Add to Cart $5.00