The Relationship of Self-Compassion with Perfectionistic Self-Presentation, Perceived Forgiveness, and Perceived Social Support in an Undergraduate Christian Community

Volume
Volume 43
Issue
Winter 2015
Title
The Relationship of Self-Compassion with Perfectionistic Self-Presentation, Perceived Forgiveness, and Perceived Social Support in an Undergraduate Christian Community
Abstract

Past research indicates that self-compassion is a unique predictor of variation in clergy burnout. Self-compassion may be a relevant and beneficial construct in Christian communities at large, but as of yet no studies have analyzed self-compassion in non-clergy Christians. This study assesses the relationship of self-compassion with perfectionistic self-presentation, perceived forgiveness, and perceived support from one’s Christian community. The study sample (N = 129) was drawn from undergraduates at a mid-sized, private, secular university in the southeastern United States who self-identified as Christians and were actively involved in a Christian campus ministry. Participants completed measures of the variables listed above through an online survey. Results indicated that those with low self-compassion reported more perfectionistic self-presentation, less perceived forgiveness, and lower perceived support from their campus ministry than those with high levels of self-reported compassion. Potential benefits of raising self-compassion among Christians are discussed.

Authors
K. E. Brodar, Dr. L.B. Crosskey and Dr. R.J. Thompson, Jr.
Pages
231 - 242
Price
Add to Cart $5.00