Cultural Differences in Family Affection and Coping Abilities for Missionary Kids

Volume
Volume 45
Issue
Summer 2017
Title
Cultural Differences in Family Affection and Coping Abilities for Missionary Kids
Abstract

While the current literature has indicated parental affection as a potential buffer to common stressors missionary kids experience, the majority of the literature is based on European American samples. However, the number of non-Western missionaries is rapidly increasing, and both ethnicity and cultural identification are thought to influence emotional development for missionary kids. In the current study, 77 Caucasian and 41 Asian missionary kids between the ages of 18–25 completed measures assessing perceived parental affection and coping abilities. Fifty-one individuals identified most with Asian culture and 51 individuals identified most with European or North American cultures. Although no significant differences were found between Caucasian and Asian samples, there were significant differences found between those who identified with non-Western and Western cultures on their measures of parental affection and coping. Those who identified with Asian cultures demonstrated greater coping abilities when they scored higher in affective orientation, perceived greater family communication, verbal affection from their mother, and greater affectionate communication from their father. These results were not seen in missionary kids who identified with Western cultures.

Authors
J.O. Kim, Dr. J. Pak and Dr. S. Eltiti
Pages
79 - 91
Price
Add to Cart $5.00