Dr. Mark A Lamport

Articles by this Author

  1. Modeling Spiritual Formation from a Distance: Paul's Formation Transactions with the Roman Christians

    Spring 2013, Technological Innovation & Educational Ministry — Pages 110-124

    This article proposes that Paul’s letter to the church in Rome can identify processes involved in offering a spiritually formative education from a distance. When Paul wrote the letter to Rome, he wrote to a church he had never visited. We argue that his relationship with the recipients is analogically similar to the relationship between professor and student in an online, educational paradigm. Paul modeled how to offer this spiritually formative relationship by emphasizing the gospel message, grounding his scriptural authority, personalizing his message, anticipating questions, enlisting the community, encouraging the recipients, praying for needs, and explaining the marks of true Christianity.
    Keywords: spiritual formation, distance learning, online education, education, Paul, Romans

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  2. All the Rage: How Small Groups are Really Educating Christian Adults, Part Three: Anchoring Small Group Ministry Practice-Biblical Insights and Leadership Development

    Spring 2009, Field Education — Pages 112-125

    This three-part series considers the current and widespread trend of church-based small groups for adult spiritual formation. It is proposed that a focus on relationships must be kept in balance with learning and application of biblical truth in order for greater spiritual growth to result. The mini-series appears in three parts: The first article (Spring 2008) assesses small group ministries for an understanding of the current state of its sometimes blemished practice. In addition, a review of Christian-oriented small group literature is included, as well as an annotated bibliography of non- Christian-oriented small group literature. The second article (Fall 2008) is intended to augment small group practice by adapting key educational insights from the academic disciplines of group dynamics, communication theory, and educational psychology. The third article (Spring 2009) anchors small group practice by delving into the unique spiritual aspects of learning and addresses the biblical/ theological apologetic for the centrality of Scripture. Finally, suggested applications are given for small group leaders and trainers of leaders as to how adults may be more effectively stimulated to learn and grow through such group involvement.

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  3. All the Rage: How Small Groups are Really Educating Christian Adults, Part 2: Augmenting Small Group Ministry Practice-Developing Small Group Leadership Skills Through Insights from Cognate Theoretical Disciplines

    Fall 2008, Ministry by and for Those Beyond the Age of 55 — Pages 391-414

    This three-part series considers the current and widespread trend of church-based small groups for adult spiritual formation. It is proposed that a focus on relationships must be kept in balance with learning and application of biblical truth in order for greater spiritual growth to result. The mini-series appears in three parts: The first article (Spring 2008) assesses small group ministries for an understanding of the current state of its sometimes blemished practice. In addition, a review of Christian-oriented small group literature is included, as well as an annotated bibliography of non- Christian-oriented small group literature. The second article (Fall 2008) is intended to augment small group practice by adapting key educational insights from the academic disciplines of group dynamics, communication theory, and educational psychology. The third article (Spring 2009) anchors small group practice by delving into the unique spiritual aspects of learning and addresses the biblical/ theological apologetic for the centrality of Scripture. Finally, suggested applications are given for small group leaders and trainers of leaders as to how adults may be more effectively stimulated to learn and grow through such group involvement.

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  4. All the Rage: How Small Groups are Really Educating Christian Adults Part 1: Assessing Small Group Ministry Practice: A Review of the Literature

    Spring 2008, College & Young Adult Ministry — Pages 116-137

    This mini-series considers the current and widespread trend of church-based small groups for adult spiritual formation. It is proposed that a focus on relationships must be kept in balance with learning and application of biblical truth in order for greater spiritual growth to result. The mini-series appears in three parts: The first article assesses small group ministries for an understanding of the current state of its sometimes-blemished practice. In addition, a review of Christian-oriented small group literature is included as well as an annotated bibliography of non-Christian-oriented small group literature. The second article (Fall 2008) is intended to augment small group practice by adapting key educational insights from the academic disciplines of group dynamics, communication theory, and educational psychology. The third article (Spring 2009) anchors small group practice by delving into the unique spiritual aspects of learning and addresses the biblical/theological apologetic for the centrality of Scripture. Finally, suggested applications are given for small group leaders and trainers of leaders as to how adults may be more effectively stimulated to learn and grow through such group involvement.

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  5. Notes - A Good-Natured Rejoinder to Gary Parrett's "Nurturing Our Faith in the Faith: A Grateful Response to Mark A. Lamport and Darrell Yoder"

    Spring 2007 — Pages 126-131

    We are gratified by Professor Gary Parrett’s kind riposte to our article “Faithful Gestures: Rebooting the Educational Mission of the Church” (CEJ, Spring 2006, 58–78). When the avowal “grateful” appears in the subtitle, one has certain expectations of pleasantness to ensue. That notwithstanding, what follows here—in the intended dialogical spirit of CEJ’s “Notes” and as a staple of civil yet pointed academic exchange between scholars—is our measured, sometimes feisty, rejoinder. In short, while we credit Parrett with due merit for his treatment of our work, and further, while we are appreciative of his thoughtful interaction with our premises and constructs, several of Parrett’s assertions and deductions need unequivocal redress.

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  6. Faithful Gestures: Rebooting the Educational Mission of the Church

    Spring 2006 — Pages 58-78

    The authors contend that two haunting conditions foster frailty within the North American church's efforts at educating its adherents--first, the curious gap in theological education segregating clergy and laity; and second, an American-style penchant slouching toward unchecked pragmatism. An analysis of the obstacles that spring from these conditions is offered. Finally, the authors articulate a distinctive educational philosophy of Christian education and propose four distinctive, although not new, theological "tent posts" to guide professors and church leaders in conceptualizing how God's people might be better educated in faith for the 21st century.

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  7. What is Youth Ministry?

    Spring 1996 — Pages 61-70

    The author presents a definition of youth ministry, develops the characteristics of a successful youth ministry, and concludes with the goal of youth ministry.

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  8. Assessing Learner Attitudes Toward Cooperative Learning

    Spring 1994 — Pages 43-52

    The author provides an introduction to the philosophy and principles of Co-op Co-Op, plus conclusions and recommendations based on research results from four groups who used Co-op Co-op to enrich their learning experience.

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  9. The State of the Profession of Youth Ministry

    Autumn 1992 — Pages 85-100

    The author comments on the profession of ministry, principles of ministry, and preparation for ministry, as it relates to youth ministry.

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  10. A Rejoinder to Rahn's and Senter's Responses

    Autumn 1992 — Pages 109-111

    The author responds to issues raised by Rahn's critique and Senter's comments.

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  11. Adolescent Spirituality: Age of Conversion and Factors of Development

    Spring 1990 — Pages 17-30

    Two descriptive research studies (N=257 and N=229), combined with a review of the literature, address two dimensions of adolescent spirituality: (1) age of conversion (e.g., At what age do most people become Christians" To what extent do males and females differ?) and (2) factors of development (e.g., What are the major influencing factors for spiritual growth in adolescents? To what extent do adolescents differ in spiritual growth when raised in homes where Christian influence is strong, medium, little, or nonexistent?) Implications for parents of youth and youth ministry programs are suggested.

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  12. The "Hand-Me-Down" Philosophy: A Challenge to Uniqueness in Christian Education

    Winter 1988 — Pages 33-40

    This article explores the idea that religious education should be teaching primarily in attitudes, values, and beliefs through experiences, and should not be comprised solely of cognitive instruction. The author examines the a-historical problem confronting religious education, the close relationship between secular and religious education, and the impact of public schools on religious education. The article concludes by noting the ways in which Christian education is distinctive from secular education.

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