Series 2

Volume 2NS, Issue 2

Fall 1998

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Articles in this Issue

  1. Here I Raise Mine Ebenezer: Reflections on the Historiography of Christian Higher Education

    By Dr. J Gregory Behle — Pages 9-31

    Christian higher education suffers from a dearth of scholarship concerning its history and historiography. This article examines the status of the literature concerning the history of American higher education in general, and Christian higher education within the United States specifically. Literature reviews are provided for the purpose of acquainting the reader with the seminal literature to a discussion of the subject. New directions and challenges to a study of Christian higher education are offered.

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  2. A Biblical Philosophy of Higher Education

    By Dr. William F Cox — Pages 33-43

    It is not uncommon for Christian higher education to perceive itself as in competition with secular counterparts. The result of this identify confusion obscures the biblically derived uniqueness of Christian higher education. Biblical perspectives regarding education are reviewed and implications for Christian higher education proposed.

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  3. John Amos Comenius: Exemplar of Integration

    By Dr. Ed Robinson — Pages 45-57

    In attempting to understand one's educational philosophy it is helpful to trace its influences in order to understand its essential character. This article explores the relevance of Comenius's educational journey on matters of integration and purpose in teaching and learning in Christian higher education.

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  4. Faith as the Transformer of Learning: Toward an Evangelical Approach to Faith-Learning Integration in Christian Higher Education

    By Dr. James R. Estep, Jr — Pages 59-76

    The integration of faith and learning has been a continual concern of the evangelical community. This concern is seen most readily in the higher education endeavors of Christian education. This article explains the concerns and challenges of faith-learning integration and surveys the various approaches and proposed methodologies for it. The article then presents an approach to and methodology for faith-learning integration based on Richard Niebuhr's Christ and Culture (1951). The discussion of faith-learning integration is placed in the context of Christian higher education, concluding with recommendations for implementing such an approach in the Christian college.

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  5. It's All In Your Mind: "Pedagogical Content Knowledge" and the Contributions of Lee Shulman to Teacher Thinking

    By Dr. Ross Cochran — Pages 77-89

    This article draws from the research on teacher thinking, and especially that part of teacher thinking known as pedagogical content knowledge. In particular, the research of Lee Shulmar is described which broadened the teaching process to include the reasoning processes which precede and guide classroom presentations. The article begins with a brief review of the research on teaching in order to trace the shift from primarily a behavioral understanding of teaching to a cognitive one.

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  6. A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of Faculty Mentoring on the Spiritual Well-Being of Late Adolescents

    By Dr. Mark W Cannister — Pages 91-110

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of faculty mentoring on the spiritual well-being (SWB) of freshman students. This inquiry examined two groups of freshmen students, their spiritual well-being and their interaction with faculty mentors. Two groups were randomly chosen from the 1993-94 freshman class of a Christian liberal arts college in New England. Students in the experimental group participated in one of ten sections of the freshmen seminar with a faculty-mentor throughout the academic year. The control group proceeded through the academic year as usual without the freshman seminar experience. Students in both groups were given a self-assessment survey in September of their freshman year and again in May of their freshman year to determine if there was any significant change in their SWB and to explore their perceptions of student-faculty interaction. Data were analyzed through a variety of statistical tests using the Statistical Program for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

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  7. Denominational Identity and Higher Education: Formation and Discernment

    By Dr. Dean G Blevins — Pages 111-122

    Denominations such as the Church of the Nazarene face a crisis of theological identity in the new, postmodern world. Denominational universities and colleges, and their religion departments, are often called upon to teach for ecclesial identity. Religion faculty who desire to teach for identity, however, face a number of tensions in balancing the internal forces of the liberal arts environment with their ministerial background and academic training. These tensions can be explored through an analysis of prescriptive and descriptive educational methods. An alternative approach based upon methods of formation and discernment is offered as a means to reconceive identity formation in higher education and perhaps overcome the current tensions.

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  8. Research Notes

    By — Pages 123-132

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  9. Book Reviews

    By — Pages 133-136

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