Series 2

Volume 6NS, Issue 1

Spring 2002

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Articles in this Issue

  1. The Adult Education Phase of the African American Church Revisited

    By Dr. Paulette Isaac — Pages 7-23

    Although often overlooked in adult education literature as a context for adult learning, the African American church has historically played an important educational role in the lives of African American adults. At a time when educational opportunities were limited, the African American church took it upon itself to function in the role of educator. In 1945, in an article entitled The Negro Church and the Adult Education Phases of its Program, S. L. Gandy provided a glimpse of the types of educational programming that took place in the African American church in the early part of the twentieth century. He also identified factors that adversely impacted adult education in the church. The purpose of this study is to revisit adult education in the African American church and to identify factors that affect its educational programming. Today'??s church offers extensive educational opportunities. Four factors were found to impact adult education in the church today.

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  2. Evaluation in Christian Education

    By Dr. Leona English — Pages 25-34

    Evaluation should be an integral part of Christian education, but rarely, if ever, are students and their actual learning evaluated. Rather, churches prefer to count "??nickels and noses,"? assessing the productivity of a program by how many people attend. This article argues that ignoring evaluation weakens the foundations of Christian education by not making educators accountable to learners or to the sponsoring bodies of our educational programs. Approaches to evaluation are considered and their applicability to church education discussed.

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  3. Can a Christian Be a Dean? Toward a Theological Approach to Academic Administration in Christian Higher Education

    By Dr. James R. Estep, Jr — Pages 35-54

    Faith-learning integration is a distinctive concern of evangelical higher education. Regardless of how one may evaluate the effectiveness of Christian higher education'??s endeavor to integrate faith and learning, the focus of these endeavors has primarily been on the academic disciplines, i.e., the curriculum or academic research. What has typically escaped notice in this concern is administration in Christian higher education. What is "Christian"? about higher education administration in the Christian or Bible college? This presentation will attempt to apply a paradigm of faith-learning integration based on Niebuhr'??s Christ and Culture (1951) to the place and function of academic administration in institutions of Christian higher education. Based on a survey of the precedent literature and a 1998-99 study of academic deans in member institutions of the Accrediting Association of Bible Colleges (AABC), this presentation will provide direction toward a theologically-informed approach to Christian academic administration. It will address the matter in seven sections: (1) Faith-learning integration and Christian higher education; (2) The necessity of a theologically-based academic administration in Christian higher education; (3) Theological foundations and frameworks for Christian higher education administration; (4) Theologically-informed values in academic administration; (5) Theologically-informed metaphors in academic administration; (6) Toward an integrated approach to academic administration in Christian higher education; and (7) Practical means of implementing a theologically-informed approach to the deanship.

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  4. Modal Shifts and Challenges for Religious Education in Catholic Schools Since Vatican II

    By Peter Hobson and Louise Welbourne — Pages 55-71

    This article examines the potential for change in religious education generated by the Council of Vatican II and several official Roman documents promulgated in the three decades that followed the council. One of the most significant contributions of the council came from its understanding of the theology of revelation as an ongoing process concerned with persons in history. A further significant contribution came from the council'??s self-understanding of a church as a community characterized by communicative action. These developments of Vatican II point to a need for religious education that insists on renewed rather than restored language for religious education - ?a discipline that addresses religious questions in a way that is relevant and comprehensible to contemporary Christians.

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  5. A Transformative Curriculum for Christian Education in the City

    By Dr. Robert W Pazmino — Pages 73-82

    Effective education must be transformative for the church and for the wider community. This article, which is a sequel to the 1997 article entitled "??Designing the Urban Theological Education Curriculum,? focuses on the themes of transformation, curriculum, and urban realities. Is it realistic to think in terms of transformation as an outcome of curriculum, especially in the context of the city? This article explores this question, seeking to empower people to be agents of transformation in an urban context.

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  6. Leadership Approach, School Climate, and Teacher Commitment: A Philippine Perspective

    By Dr. John Wesley Taylor V and Dr. Masih Charan John — Pages 83-110

    This study explores the interrelationships among principals'?? leadership approach, school climate, and the organizational commitment of teachers in Seventh-day Adventist secondary schools in the Philippines. Data was obtained from 227 full-time teachers in 20 schools. Participants responded to the Leadership Opinion Questionnaire (LOQ), the Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire - ??Rutgers Secondary (OCDQ-Rs), and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ). Teachers perceived higher commitment under a leadership characterized by high levels of consideration, regardless of the degree of initiating structure. Teachers'?? organizational commitment was positively related to climate openness - ??characterized by supportive principal behavior and teacher engagement, intimacy, and low levels of teacher frustration. Furthermore, considerate leadership behavior was found to relate positively to climate openness. Predictive models of organizational commitment, accounting for approximately 25% of the variance, included marital status, considerate leadership behavior, and aspects of school climate. Although the theoretical construct of leadership quadrants was upheld in the study, it appears that leadership behavioral dimensions, particularly consideration, are more useful in studies relating to school climate and the organizational commitment of teachers.

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  7. A Selective Defense of "Introduction to Christian Doctrine" Online: Disputatious Perspectives and Propitiating Pedagogy

    By Dr. Dave S Knowlton and Dr. James Thorne and C Harry Harriss — Pages 111-125

    Should Christian colleges offer doctrine courses online? Both faculty and students raise questions regarding the compatibility of teaching doctrine with online formats for delivery. After setting the discussion in its proper context, this article presents four common objections to teaching doctrine online and answers these objections from the experience of teaching doctrine online. The three authors designed an online Introduction to Christian Doctrine course, and two of them teach it regularly.

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  8. Book Reviews

    By — Pages 129-140

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