Series 3

Volume 7, Issue 1

Spring 2010, Experiential Learning

Special focus issues also contain articles of general interest to the field of Christian education.

Buy This Issue:

Note: shipping cost not included

Articles in this Issue

  1. Editorial: Experiential Learning and Much, Much More

    By Dr. Kevin E Lawson — Pages 3-5

    Buy Article (PDF): Free

    View Abstract

  2. Epistemological Assumptions in Evaluation: The Intersection Between Philosophy and Practice of Youth Ministry

    By Dr. Michael K Severe — Pages 6-29

    Evaluation is ubiquitous, value laden, often implicit, and closely tied to improvement and effectiveness. A two-tier qualitative method was used to uncover the practice and understanding of evaluation among youth pastors. Overreliance on indicators, such as stories and simple observation, tended to reinforce assumptions in practice. Evaluation was pervasive, powerfully guided perception, and steered outcomes more powerfully than philosophy of ministry. Evaluation framed the way youth pastors saw the world.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  3. Ministry Students Ages of Conversion, With Implications for Childhood Evangelism and Baptism Practices

    By Dr. Dennis Horton — Pages 30-51

    In recent years, the age of conversion and baptism in North America has steadily decreased for most Christian faith traditions that practice believer's baptism. Several denominational leaders and Christian educators have expressed concerns about the possible negative effects related to these seemingly premature conversions. The findings from a national study of ministry students, however, provide some evidence that early conversions of individuals within a strong Christian environment (i.e., devout Christian parents and a high level of church involvement) do not necessarily have detrimental effects on the individual's spiritual growth or long-term faith commitment. Nevertheless, some basic guidelines should be followed to encourage the most appropriate practices related to childhood evangelism and baptism.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  4. Six-Year Outcome Effects of Former Timothy-Award Recipients

    By Dr. Michael W. Firmin and Andrew Clemans — Pages 52-69

    We conducted 24 interviews in a phenomenological qualitative research study in as part of appraising the perceived residual outcomes of the AWANA program. Our sample consisted of individuals who were Timothy award recipients 6 years prior to the data collection. Two prominent themes were evidenced through analysis of the participantsâ?? transcripts. The first centered on the former Timothy recipientsâ?? cognitions concerning the people with whom they interacted during their AWANA experience. These related to the relationships they recalled from their AWANA days. The second theme focused on the memorization that was accomplished in order to receive the Timothy award. Overall, participants believe it was a worthwhile endeavor and profitable for their long-term spiritual development.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  5. Cross-Cultural Field Education: A Transformative Learning Experience

    By Dr. Ellen L Marmon — Pages 70-83

    Seminary field education offers students a hands-on way to connect theology and practice. When that practice occurs in a cross-cultural setting, students and faculty need an educational lens to guide their experiences of teaching and learning. Mezirowâ??s Transformative Learning Theory informs and forms the process of exploring ministry in unfamiliar settings that are right next door.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  6. Spiritual Formation in Theological Distance Education: An Ecosystems Model

    By Dr. Mary E Lowe and Dr. Stephen D Lowe — Pages 84-102

    This article sets forth a model of student spiritual formation in Christian distance education that integrates the biblical concept of spiritual development that takes place within the spiritual ecology of the church as the body of Christ with Bronfenbrenner's Ecology of Human Development theory. The ecosystems model views spiritual formation as an ecological phenomenon whether the ecosystem exists in physical, spiritual, or cyberspace environments, thereby offering evidence for the possibility of student spiritual formation in Christian distance education settings regardless of physical proximity.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  7. Guest Editorial Introduction to the Special Focus: Experiential Education

    By Dr. Karen Jones — Pages 103-106

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  8. Experiential Learning: Theory and Challenges

    By Dr. Norma S Hedin — Pages 107-117

    Christian educators make use of the various approaches to experiential learning in their classrooms, in their institutions as a whole, and in their field-based assignments for students. This article introduces the reader to the foundational issues of experiential learning, including definitions, theoretical roots, experiential learning models, and unique processes related to experiential learning.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  9. Situated Learning: Optimizing Experiential Learning Through God-given Learning Community

    By Dr. Stephen Kemp — Pages 118-143

    This article explores the educational concept of experiential learning, particularly in terms of service learning and situated learning. It proposes an alternative definition of an academic learning community, namely the role of primary social relationships as God-given contexts for learning. It concludes with practical application of the enormous potential for accomplishment of educational objectives through situated learning.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  10. Redefining Camp Ministry as Experiential Laboratory for Spiritual Formation and Leadership Development

    By Rob Ribbe — Pages 144-161

    This paper critiques contemporary Christian camp ministry, outlining its strengths and weaknesses, and suggests a paradigm to address the needs of individuals and churches in our rapidly changing culture. A philosophical framework that utilizes the principles of temporary community, experiential education, and the outdoor environment is discussed. A case is made for utilizing camp ministry as a vital equipping center for the development of future leaders for the church and society worldwide through creative partnerships between camps and Christian colleges.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  11. Integrating a Service and Learning Paradigm in a Christian Education Environment

    By Dr. Steve Mullen — Pages 162-171

    This article introduces the concept and practice of service-learning in higher education in America. Following a brief overview of the history of service-learning, the following definition of service- learning is proposed: a teaching and learning strategy that integrates academic instruction, community service, and guided reflection from a Christ-centered, faith based perspective in order to enhance student learning, to foster civic responsibility, and to develop servant leaders. Building on this definition, the article considers arguments for and against service-learning, identifies principles of best practice for service-learning pedagogy, presents guiding principles when organizing/constructing service-learning courses, and introduces various models of service-learning. The article culminates with the question, "Should degree programs in Christian education integrate a service-learning component in the degree plan?"

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  12. How We Learn from Short-Term Mission Experiences: A Grounded Theory Modification of the Joplin Method

    By Dr. Terrence D Linhart — Pages 172-185

    Numerous models exist that help us understand how experiential education "works" yet their foundations vary and often do not connect well to actual learning processes. Models should prove most helpful, reflecting research-based historical practices of how people learn through experience. This paper presents grounded theory research that develops and proposes a modification of the Joplin model that provides a more accurate model of how North American adolescents learned from their experiences while on a short-term mission trip.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  13. The PRIME Experience: Practical Research and Immersion in Ministry Effectiveness

    By Dr. Luke S Fetters — Pages 186-198

    In the mid-1990s, Huntington University revised their traditional, undergraduate Bachelor of Science ministry preparation program to include Practical Research and Immersion in Ministry Effectiveness, more commonly known as PRIME. PRIME is a 7-month, full-time practical ministry assignment that allows students to integrate cognitive input, ministry experience, spiritual formation, and critical reflection. This integrated model is consistent with Ted Ward's split-rail fence curriculum model, which is expanded in Fred Holland's two-track model. The Ministry and Missions Department at Huntington University conducted an alumni survey in 2007 that revealed common PRIME learning outcomes.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  14. Book Reviews

    By Dr. Jane Carr — Pages 199-253

    Formational children’s ministry: Shaping children using story, ritual and relationship.
    By Ivy Beckwith. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker. 2010. 160pp.
    Review by Teresa D.Welch, Christian Education, Emmanuel School of Religion, Johnson City, TN.

    The family God uses: Leaving a legacy of influence. By Tom and Kim Blackaby. Birmingham, AL: New Hope. 2009.
    Review by Herschell Baker, Adjunct Faculty in Discipleship and Christian Formation, Pentecostal Theological Seminary, Cleveland, TN.

    The pastoral care of children. By Daniel Grossoehme. New York: The Hawthorne Pastoral Press. 1999.
    Review by Thomas Sanders, Director of Master of Arts in Christian Education: Childhood Ministry, Dallas Baptist University, Dallas, TX.

    Building faith at home:Why faith at home must be your church’s #1 priority. By Mark A. Holmen. Ventura, CA: Regal Books. 2007.
    Review by Waylan Owens, School of Church and Family Ministries, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, TX.

    Perspectives on family ministry: 3 views. By Paul Renfro, Brandon Shields, and Jay Strother. Edited by Timothy Paul Jones. Nashville, TN: B & H Academic. 2009.
    Review by Chris Shirley, Assistant Professor of Adult Ministry, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, TX.

    When the church was a family: Recapturing Jesus’ vision for authentic Christian community. By Joseph H. Hellerman. Nashville, TN: B&H Publishing Group. 2009.
    Review by Julie A. Gorman, Professor of Christian Formation and Discipleship, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA.

    A theology for Christian education. By James R. Estep, Jr.,Michael J. Anthony, and Gregg R. Allison.Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman. 2008.
    Review by David C. Strawn, Minister of Education, First Baptist Church, College Station, TX and Resident Fellow, B.H. Carroll Theological Institute, Arlington, TX.

    Everything must change: Jesus, global crises, and a revolution of hope. By Brian D.McLaren. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson. 2007.
    Review by Michael Brian Thompson, Associate Professor, Practical Theology, Ashland Theological Seminary, Ashland, OH.

    Engaging minds: Changing teaching in complex times. 2nd ed. By Brent Davis, Dennis Sumara, and Rebecca Luce-Kepler. New York, NY: Routledge. 2008.
    Review by Baltazar Alvarez, Assistant Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies, Criswell College, Dallas TX.

    Creating stories that connect: A pastor’s guide to storytelling. By D. Bruce Seymour. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Academic and Professional. 2007.
    Review by Marcia McQuitty, Childhood Education, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, TX.

    Teaching the faith, forming the faithful: A biblical vision for education in the church. By Gary A. Parrett and S. Steve Kang. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press. 2009.
    Review by Mark H. Heinemann, Associate Professor of Christian Education, Dallas Theological Seminary, Dallas, TX.

    Desiring the kingdom: Worship, worldview, and cultural formation. By James K.A. Smith. Grand Rapids, MI, Baker Academic. 2009.
    Review by Halee Gray Scott, Adjunct Faculty, Haggard Graduate School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA.

    Discovering discipleship: Dynamics of faithful Christian education. By Dean G. Blevins and Mark A. Maddix. Kansas City, KS: Beacon Hill Press. 2010.
    Review by Linden D. McLaughlin, Professor of Christian Education, Dallas Theological Seminary, Dallas, TX.

    In search of a confident faith: Overcoming barriers to trusting in God. By J. P. Moreland and Klaus Issler. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press. 2008.
    Review by Mark H. Heinemann, Associate Professor of Christian Education, Dallas Theological Seminary, Dallas, TX.

    Theological education matters: Leadership education for the church. By Linda Cannell. Newberg, IN: EDCOT Press. 2006.
    Review by Rosemary Wahu Mbogo, Department of Christian Education, Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology, Nairobi, Kenya.

    Buy Article (PDF): Free

    View Abstract

Biola University
13800 Biola Ave. La Mirada, CA 90639
1-562-903-6000
© Biola University, Inc. All Rights Reserved.