Series 1

Volume I, Issue 2

Spring 1981

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Articles in this Issue

  1. Church Leader Motivation

    By Edward A Buchanan — Pages 5-11

    This article offers help to the church staff in better understanding the motivation of volunteer church leaders and encouraging and supporting those volunteers in their leadership responsibilities. The author examines theories in the field of motivation and draws principles and applications within a Christian perspective.

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  2. Atmospheric Christian Education

    By Charles M Sell — Pages 12-14

    A church's "atmosphere," or "climate," is becoming a major factor in its Christian education ministry. The mood and spirit of a group, and the way it operates, communicates a lot about the organization itself. The author suggests ways to cultivate an express of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.

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  3. Change in the Local Church: Philosophy and Practice

    By Ronald W Leigh — Pages 15-20

    When a person thinks about change in his local church, he usually has a number of practical concerns on his mind (timing, type of change, people's acceptance, etc.). However, the most basic of these concerns is whether or not Christianity is subject to change. A brief discussion of this issue leads to the conclusion that basic ministry principles do not change, but current patterns and methods can, and often should, change. Current patterns should not only allow but also encourage the basic ministry principles to operate. Then 34 practical guidelines are given for the change-agent, stressing his role as a patient educator rather than a bulldozer.

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  4. The Method Variable as a Facilitative Factor in the Teaching-Learning Process

    By David Bowman — Pages 21-28

    The author examines the role of method in the teaching-learning process. He lists principles of instruction or teacher behavior in the learning process and examines several learning principles which may be used as the basis of determining the teaching method. He also classifies teaching models as to their effectiveness in dealing with different subjects. He believes using alternate methods of instruction will upgrade the teaching-learning process.

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  5. God's Blueprint for the Church

    By Charles H Nichols — Pages 29-31

    The author draws the biblical pattern for the local church from a grammatical analysis of Ephesians 4:11-16. He discusses the headship of Christ as carried on by the Holy Spirit, the ministry of multiple leadership, fellowship and commitment to service, and the attainment of maturity and unity.

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  6. Progressive Conceptual Development and Its Implications for Teaching in the Church

    By Susan E Hayes — Pages 32-36

    In order for communication to be effective, learning to be successful, or abstract thought to be developed, the process of conceptual development should be understood. Factors influencing conceptual development include environment, parents, peers, physical attributes, intellectual maturity, language and communication skills, and spiritual development. Conceptual development matures in three stages: (1) Preconceptual, (2) Concrete, and (3) Abstract. Effective teaching takes place when conceptual development is understood. This allows for development of the child's self-image, accelerated spiritual maturity, and avoidance of misconceptions. Basic principles should be understood such as use of symbolic concepts, clarity of theological concepts, sequential teaching, singular concept approach, evaluation and adjustment of information, and integration of information.

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  7. Exploring the Measurement of Values

    By Jack Keat — Pages 37-42

    The author expresses his concern at the general absence of attention to measurable objects in the internalization of values and attitudes. He says Christian educators can learn from the secular world's recent progress in the measurement of attitudes. The behavioral theory and cognitive-field theory are introduced to sharpen the definition of attitudes. The author describes several methods of determining the existence or non-existence of attitudes, including observation of behavior and the self-report.

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  8. A Proposal for Young Single Adults

    By Cheryl M Black — Pages 43-47

    The establishment of a single adult identity poses a major challenge to each individual trekking the path between belonging to a family and marriage. Among the difficulties of singleness are loneliness, finding acceptance, and establishing one's separate adult identity. As the church seeks to reach the single adult, these needs must be considered. A balanced program consisting of fellowship, express, and edification is the ideal solution. Social interaction will facilitate the building of relationships and thereby help the single adult with his personal loneliness. Bible input will aid in building strong adult identities. Ministry opportunities are necessary for spiritual growth and developing a sense of personal belonging.

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  9. Implementing Christian Education in the Home

    By Laurie Hall — Pages 48-52

    Today much attention is being given to Christian education in the local church. However, it is vastly important that Christian education in the church have as one of its goals to prepare parents to be Christian educators in the home, for that is where Christian education can be most effective. The following paper establishes the important of implementing Christian education in the home as well as provides a few tips and warns of some dangers.

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  10. The Christian Teacher-An Authentic Person

    By Richard Osberg — Pages 53-54

    This article addresses the difference it makes whether a Christian or non-Christian teacher guides students in meaningful learning experiences. The author establishes the distinctives of a Christian and the Christian perspective on life. Furthermore, he touches on the effect a Christian's frame of reference plays in his daily teaching situation.

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  11. Habit Formation

    By Thomas K Stoner — Pages 55-64

    The author begins by defining the term habit. Careful attention is given to explaining the stimulus-response and cognitive-field learning theories as they relate to habit formation. Finally, principles from both schools are included in building a useful model of habit formation consistent with biblical teaching.

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  12. Music and Christian Education

    By Jerry W McCant — Pages 65-67

    This article addresses the function music plays in the Christian education of children. Although music has secondary values, its primary function in effective Christian education is that of a teaching method. It is an excellent way to teach biblical and theological ideas to children. Because music is both method and curriculum, it is imperative that leaders select music appropriate to the teaching situation and lesson plan.

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  13. Biblical Distinctives Between the Content and Character of Teaching and Preaching

    By Dr. Neal F McBride and W Creighton Marlowe — Pages 68-74

    The authors lead the reader through an exploration of the terms used for "teaching" and "preaching" in the New Testament. Both the content and character of the terms are examined.

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  14. Book Reviews

    By — Pages 75-78

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