Series 1

Volume III, Issue 2

Spring 1983

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Articles in this Issue

  1. Child Evangelization

    By Dr. Perry G Downs — Pages 5-13

    Historically there have been a variety of approaches to the issue of the evangelization of children. Each of these approaches has been based on certain theological or psychological foundations. This article attempts to describe five of the more prominent approaches to the evangelization of children, to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each, and to offer guidelines for a theology of childhood evangelization. The critical areas of concern are the true nature and demands of saving faith, the problem of original sin, the developmental characteristics of children, and the unique status of children born to Christian parents.

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  2. Six Models of Teaching for Moral Development

    By Dr. Ted Ward and Rodney McKean — Pages 14-29

    In this article the authors present six models of teaching values development. Three methods of classifying the models are presented, including content-oriented or structure-oriented, pre-Kohlberg or post-Kohlberg, and acquisitional or developmental. Each of the six models is described in terms of teaching procedures, assumptions about learning, the nature of values, moral development, and educational objectives. Finally, the authors present six criteria for teachers to use in evaluating the models.

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  3. Home-Centered Christian Education

    By David L Birch — Pages 30-38

    There are three important agencies to the Christian--the church, the Christian school, and the home. The thesis is that the church and the Christian school are only as strong as the Christian home. This article argues that the home is the central agency for education and the home is God's provision for building strong disciples. Deuteronomy 6:1-7 is analyzed as the biblical basis for this thesis. The article promotes a holistic view of Christian home education. The emphasis is on a growing Christian lifestyle, but practical ideas for implementation are also suggested. The article concludes that home-centered Christian education provides for stronger churches, Christian schools, and evangelistic outreach.

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  4. The Mentally Handicapped: A Challenge for the Church

    By Curtis E Alexander — Pages 39-45

    This article examines the dynamics of providing Christian education for the mentally handicapped. It analyzes problems often encountered, and offers possible methods for their solution. By juxtaposing common problems with potential solutions, one can begin to see that ministering to the retarded holds forth promise and reward. The author uses a variety of resources for the research of the paper, including advice and guidance from professionals in Christian education of the retarded, experiences gained from programs in Hawaii, Michigan, Ohio, and Tennessee, and concepts formed by such experts as Gloria Hawley, Jean Piaget, and Willard Abraham.

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  5. Your Task-What Is It?

    By Larry McCullough — Pages 46-60

    This article gives essential information on areas that need to be considered by the Christian educator when confronted with his task. For the "task-holder," the emphasis should be on understanding. This is where the task begins. It is important, in understanding one's role, to consider those with whom he works and their expectations. As one evaluates church staff relations and their functions, he can better see where his task fits in the ministry. Foundational to one's task is his philosophy of Christian education. As one establishes his philosophy, he can set better goals and objectives, make better evaluations, and choose more appropriate curriculum material and resources. It is also essential to consider seriously one's job description in order to grasp the whole perspective of ministry. Relationships must be defined, benefits and essentials established and expectations and responsibilities designated. This will then make it easier to determine one's scope of authority in which areas of accountability and control are established. Understanding the task is not complete, however, unless one understands the importance of a job well done and of the needed review and evaluation afterward. Evaluation is essential for growth and progress, both for the individual and for the whole.

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  6. Church Committees and Adult Education

    By Roberta Hestenes — Pages 61-67

    A renewed emphasis on adult Christian education in congregations requires persons who are committed to the centrality of this aspect of congregational life and structures which facilitate the work of a ministry team or committee in adult education. Suggestions are made as to what such structures are and how such a team can be recruited and trained, as well as discussing what is needed for effective and productive committee work.

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  7. Teaching Machines in the Church: An Educational Perspective

    By Mark E Simpson — Pages 68-72

    The mass production of computers has increased the probability that teaching machines will emerge in secular education programs in the not too distant future. Christian educators must begin now to address themselves to the issue of teaching machines in the church. The basic concepts underlying teaching machines and their programmed instructions contain many benefits that are superior to most methods of teaching used today. However, negative reactions from the educational community have delayed the onset of teaching machines on a large scale. As the prospect for the implementation of these mechanical devices increased, the Christian education system must decide if teaching machines should be used in the church, and how teaching machines would be used if they were accepted.

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  8. Book Reviews

    By — Pages 73-79

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