Series 1

Volume VI, Issue 1

Fall 1985

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Articles in this Issue

  1. Apt to Teach: Preparation for Ministry in a Silicon Society

    By Daniel C Stevens — Pages 5-18

    We are witnessing the first phases of a technological revolution. The educational implications of this progress are significant. Though the field of religious education has a heritage of educational theory and audiovisual awareness, it also has a tradition of utilizing the lecture method. The potential exists for high-tech innovation to fulfill the requirements of Bloom's excellent approach to mastery learning. Their capacity for cognitive, affective, and skill development is unique. Educators must break a trend of disuse and employ the review, drill, and simulation functions that will be available to those who are "apt to teach."

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  2. A Conception of Excellence in Teaching

    By Dr. Klaus Issler — Pages 19-23

    How one views teaching significantly affects how one practices teaching. The process-product orientation to teaching, the most common conception of teaching, presumes too much of a causal relation between teaching and learning and, thus, requires a greater degree of teacher accountability than is realistic and necessary. Instead, a more circumscribed conception of teaching is offered as the basis for an inquiry into excellence in teaching. Finally, a suggestive list of eleven factors is presented as ingredients which are essential for excellent teaching to occur.

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  3. Ministering to the Retarded

    By Dr. Donald Ratcliff — Pages 24-30

    The mentally retarded are, by definition, different from average people. This difference should have an important effect upon the methods of teaching and curriculum utilized in religious education. By examining the characteristics of the retarded, church workers are more likely to adapt appropriate methodologies in communicating with these individuals.

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  4. Religious Education Programs in Zimbabwe

    By Audrey Greenshields — Pages 31-36

    In the past the Christina church sought to meet its responsibility to educate in ways that related to the historical development of Zimbabwe. Now, with self-rule, the indigenous church is exploring the part it can play in the state's broader religious education programs in the schools. These programs are based on a life-approach to learning which provides for reflection on traditional values so that these may be confirmed, deepened, or challenged by biblical study and faith may be integrated with life.

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  5. Does a D.E.E. Need a Master's Degree?

    By Ann D Jaynes — Pages 37-46

    This article takes a look at what a Director of Christian Education on the staff of a church is, and what the qualifications for such a position are. The major emphasis is on the educational qualifications, with the largest part of the article reporting on research done concerning the need for a Director of Christian Education to have a master's degree. It is hoped that this article will be helpful both to men and women preparing for jobs as DCE's and to churches seeking to hire staff persons in addition to their preacher.

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  6. Biblical Sources for the Reappraisal of Education

    By Dr. Robert W Pazmino — Pages 47-51

    This article considers two biblical models for the reappraisal of education in light of recent questions about the effectiveness of public schools. Christian distinctives are identified from an Old Testament model in the Book of Deuteronomy and from a New Testament model in the Gospel of Matthew. A discussion of the models is followed by specific suggestions for reform in Christian education in the local church that emerge directly from Scripture. Such an effort encourages readers to consider biblical sources in current discussions of educational reform.

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  7. Orientations to Curriculum Development for Church Education

    By Burt D Braunius — Pages 52-61

    This article surveys the historical development of three primary orientations to curriculum. The curriculum designs of major theorists are described and examples are given of the application of these designs to Christian education in the church. The three orientations view curriculum as being preservative, productive, and participative. Exposure to these orientations should provide two kids of insights for church educators: 1. Insights into curriculum design assumptions and procedures as they relate to overall curriculum strategies and to curriculum materials; and 2. Insights into which orientation(s) to curriculum are most consistent with their Christian values.

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  8. The Spiritual Gift of Teaching

    By Bert E Downs — Pages 62-67

    The gift of teaching-is it an outgrowth of natural abilities, spontaneously supernatural, or something in between? These and other controversial questions come to bear as the author constructs a functional, "Church" definition of the gift of teaching. Following the definition, he then traces its identification through a two-part plan for one's discerning the presence of the gift. Finally, the article ends with an emphasis on commitment and a penetrating question for prospective teachers.

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  9. Research Notes

    By — Pages 69-75

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  10. Book Reviews

    By — Pages 76-81

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