Series 1

Volume X, Issue 2

Winter 1990

Buy This Issue:

Note: shipping cost not included

Articles in this Issue

  1. Gender and Age Differences among Christian Education Practitioners

    By Beth E Brown and Dr. Dennis E Williams — Pages 9-16

    As more women and second career students enter theological studies, it is timely to investigate the experience of women and adults over forty in Christian educational ministries. This article describes both gender and age differences in the areas of: educational preparation for ministry; current ministry experience, including part-time versus full-time status, church size, and denominational affiliation; task analysis; level of ministry satisfaction; felt needs regarding ministry preparation; and those aspects of ministry that have yielded most enjoyment.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  2. Reading Between the Lines: The Problem of Unwritten Expectations

    By Chris W Tornquist — Pages 17-24

    This article is an investigation into the problem of unwritten expectations for those on a church staff. It considers the scope of the problem, the sources of the expectations, and concludes with nine ideas which one can implement in order to better cope with the difficulty presented. It is asserted that there are two sources for unwritten expectations: those which come from other people, and those which are standards set up by the person himself. It is also suggested that there are viable steps which can be taken to reduce the number of unwritten expectations in any church staff position, as well as minimize the effects of those unwritten expectations which inevitably remain.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  3. Theological Education by Extension: An Alternative in Education

    By Dr. Harley T Atkinson — Pages 25-38

    In the last two or three decades mission has been significantly affected and influenced by theological education by extension. Proponents of this philosophy and development insist that it is capable of providing an education comparable to resident programs. While its effect or impact has been felt primarily in third world countries, the implications for Christian education in North America are numerous and must be considered.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  4. Teaching the Bible: The Church's Unfinished Task

    By Leland Ryken and Dr. James C Wilhoit — Pages 39-46

    In this article, the authors discuss the neglect of solid Bible teaching in the contemporary church. The authors points out that with better teacher training teachers can learn to master a biblical text in terms of the kind of writing it is, to interpret its meaning, to speak to a class's imagination, and to show the relevance of the Bible to everyday living.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  5. An Examination of Teaching Paradigms: Three Dialogical Approaches which Strengthen Traditional Andragogical Practice

    By Dr. Ronald T Habermas — Pages 47-54

    Typically, adult education in the church has favored a monological style of instruction. Though this approach does have merit, there are several all-too-important weaknesses when it is used almost exclusively. In order to balance andragogical practice, dialogue becomes imperative. Employment of complementary, dialogical learning patterns--through the illustrations of four biblical metaphors--highlights the essence of this article.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  6. Educating People to be Christian

    By Dr. Jackie L Smallbones — Pages 55-64

    The purpose of this article is to explore the questions: What is Christian education: How can it be done? The author maintains that an understanding of what it means to be Christian is vital to methodology. The schooling-instructional model is shown to teach that being Christian means knowing and understanding Scripture. The author argues that begin Christian means relationships with God as Father and with fellow Christians; therefore, the instructional model must be supplemented with the socialization model.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  7. Christian Formation

    By Dr. Julie A Gorman — Pages 65-74

    All our efforts in Christian education are in the direction of maturing individuals in Christ-likeness. This article deals with identifying factors in that process and the way in which they form an ecology for the cultivation of this maturing. Knowing these elements foster the formation process, what can the Christian educator do to incorporate these elements in a designed formation experience?

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  8. Nurturing Marriage and Family Life

    By Dr. Klaus Issler — Pages 75-86

    The Christian home is in need of strategic reinforcement. But what can the church do to help strengthen the family? In this article, the author suggests that the church's traditional support for the family--usually coming in the form of informational resources--can be greatly enhanced by a concern for how information is best learned. In designing the educational ministries of the church, consideration must be given to both the content to be taught as well as the process by which the content will be most effectively learned.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  9. Nurturing Spirituality in the Matrix of Human Development

    By Dr. Mark S Young — Pages 87-98

    Spiritual development is a very difficult subject to understand. For most, spirituality is easier to live than to define. In this article, the author examines three common approaches to spirituality and suggests ways in which educators can better nurture spirituality by viewing it in the border context of human development.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  10. Our Brother's Keeper: The Individual in Caring Community and the Mentally Handicapped

    By Wendy L Tibbatts — Pages 99-106

    The importance of the individual and of his community are complementary biblical concepts. In both Old and New Testaments, especially in the life of Jesus and in the community of His followers (the church), we see these two principles in harmony. Western society does not have a biblical view of either, and this is reflected in our response to the mentally handicapped. Properly understood, these concepts free us from condescension in the teaching of them mentally handicapped, and allow them to minister and share responsibility as members of their society.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  11. A Response to Jackie Smallbones' Assessment of Thomas Groome's Christian Religious Education

    By Dr. Barbara J Bjelland — Pages 107-110

    This article reviews Jackie Smallbones' view of evangelicalism and assessment of Thomas Groome's Christian Religious Education in the Autumn 1986 issue of this journal. Both authors are critiqued in order to reach a more balanced, biblically-based view of the purpose and methods of Christian education.

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

    View Abstract

  12. Research Notes

    By — Pages 111-119

    Buy Article (PDF): $5.00

  13. Book Reviews

    By — Pages 121-127

    Buy Article (PDF): Free

Biola University
13800 Biola Ave. La Mirada, CA 90639
1-562-903-6000
© Biola University, Inc. All Rights Reserved.