Series 1

Volume XI, Issue 1

Autumn 1990

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Articles in this Issue

  1. Who are the Baby Boomers?

    By James A Mathisen — Pages 13-24

    People born in the U.S. after the end of World War II compose a sociological entity unlike anything experienced before. This article explores the who, what, why, and wherefore of Baby Boomers. Its task is to set a definitional context for this thematic issue.

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  2. Baby Boomers' Ministry Needs

    By Dr. Perry G Downs — Pages 25-32

    The makeup of the Church ahs been affected by the phenomenon of Baby Boomers. This bulge in the population brings about obvious program needs in churches. The church is well into the process of responding to these program needs with creative and often effective curriculum. In addition, staff specialists in Baby Boomer ministry are becoming the norm. But while these types of responses speak to the immediate needs of the generation, do they reach to the deeper needs? The thesis of this article is that the ministry needs of the Baby Boomers are rooted in the philosophies of the '80s and '90s, and the church's response must first be theological.

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  3. Ministering to the Families of Baby Boomers

    By Beth E Brown — Pages 33-40

    Baby Boomers desire stability in their family life but have need for a strong theology of family that underscores Christian commitment. Their strong valuing of individualism must be balanced by an understanding of Christian community. And finally, churches must pay attention t the stresses in family life today, and minister to families with Christian compassion.

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  4. Evangelism and Baby Boomers

    By Dr. Neal F McBride — Pages 41-50

    The focus of this article is on evangelism to Baby Boomers. Why is it important? Is it still relevant? How is it accomplished? What can local churches do This article considers the church's corporate responsibility for the mission, message, and method of evangelism among Baby Boomers.

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  5. Recruiting the Baby Boomer for Ministry

    By Fred R Wilson — Pages 51-68

    The purpose of this article is to examine the recruitment of Baby Boomers in the evangelical church. After laying a brief biblical and theoretical foundation for volunteerism, the author will present the results of an empirical research study of Baby Boomers' reasons for serving. Finally, specific recommendations for recruiting Baby Boomers for ministry will be proposed.

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  6. A Senior Pastor's Perspective on Baby Boomers

    By Leith C Anderson — Pages 69-78

    Baby Boomers give unprecedented possibilities to senior pastors. The author creatively seeks to understand this generation's characteristics in relationship to the church and suggests ways to use those characteristics for good.

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  7. A Minister of Education's Perspective on Baby Boomers

    By Edward D Seely and Thomas S Moucka — Pages 79-86

    How can the church program in order to provide the resources that will help Baby Boomers grow toward Christlikeness? Educators in the field of curriculum development have established principles and practical programs that provide structure for programming to minister to Baby Boomers.

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  8. Jonathan Edwards: A Man Swallowed Up In God

    By Robert E Coleman — Pages 87-94

    Jonathan Edwards was a universally acclaimed theologian, philosopher, scientist, psychologist, preacher, college president, and Christian apologist. In this article, the author evaluates the influence of one of the greatest shapers of American intellectual and religious history.

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  9. Narrative Theology and Storytelling in Christian Education with Children

    By Laurie L Nelson — Pages 95-104

    Narrative theology affects people emotionally as well as intellectually. The story form is beneficial in ways such as uniting people with nature, carrying them back to childhood and helping to fathom paradox. Bruno Bettelheim suggests that fairy tales help children work through symbolized conflicts. James Fowler's Intuitive-Projective stage of ages 2-6 is one in which imagination and fantasy are prominent. John Westerhoff challenges the church to recognize the importance of transmitting its story to the young. All people should be taught stories of God, of tradition, and of God's people today. Some guidelines for storytelling help make it more effective.

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  10. What's Wrong with Christian Education in Evangelical Churches Today?

    By Dr. Jackie L Smallbones — Pages 105-112

    Phillip Kirsch's article, "Personal Interaction: The Missing Ingredient in Christian Education" (Journal of Christian Education, vol. 3, no.1) forms the basis of this article. Kirsch drew on three lines of evidence to demonstrate that the problem with Christian education is a lack of personal interaction. In this article, Ms. Smallbones argues that Kirsch's evidence is pragmatic rather than biblical and doesn't form a good criterion for evaluation. She agrees that something is wrong and suggests the real problem is a fear of letting the Holy Spirit control.

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  11. Research Notes

    By — Pages 113-122

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  12. Book Review

    By — Pages 123-130

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