Series 1

Volume XV, Issue 1

Fall 1994

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Articles in this Issue

  1. Critical Thinking and Christian Perspective

    By Dr. Lawrence O Richards — Pages 13-20

    Jesus criticized the Pharisees' practice of codifying religious beliefs and behavior without thinking critically about their implications. If we take seriously the proposition that Scripture is God's revelation of reality, then we must constantly test our beliefs and behavior by the Word of God.

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  2. More Than Content

    By Stephen Snyder — Pages 21-32

    Concept coverage is inadequate for applying knowledge to solve problems. Procedural and metacognitive knowledge needs to be included in instruction. Problem-solving thinking is necessary if learners are to understand and apply Scripture, discover intrinsic motivation, and process their emotions effectively. This article clarifies the steps of critical thinking for problem solving.

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  3. The Definition of Critical Thought and Its Implications for Christian Education

    By George W Stickel — Pages 33-41

    For Christian Education there is special concern for the understanding of critical thinking--a "hot topic" for the 1990s--in relation to the development of a person's faith and intellectual comprehension of such concepts as God, the cosmos, discipleship, covenant, sin, and the church. Questions in apologetics, the role of emotion in religion, and even the preparation of a Sunday School lesson, all find answers in the nature of critical thought.

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  4. The Sacramentality of Critique and Its Challenge to Christian Educators

    By Dr. Michael Warren — Pages 42-52

    As a process of self-reflection motivated by an interest in emancipation, critique or critical thinking suggests a habit of approaching reality from more than one angle, of asking questions that often do not get asked. Three key terms of critical thinking are described and applied to a strategy for empowering youth to address social problems from a Gospel perspective.

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  5. The Thinking Climate: A Missing Ingredient in Youth Ministry?

    By Eugene C Roehlkepartian — Pages 53-63

    Data from a national study of Protestant congregations are used to examine the importance of creating a thinking climate in youth ministry. While fewer than half of all youth experience a strong thinking climate in a congregation, those who do tend to have stronger faith and commitment. This article suggests several areas where the research points to factors in congregational life that contribute to a thinking climate in youth ministry.

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  6. Mind Over Management: The Role of Critical Thinking in Educational Administration

    By Dr. Kenneth O. Gangel and Christy Sullivan — Pages 64-74

    The educational administrator who actively sets out to promote the use of critical thinking skills--and to implement the results of those skills--may lose the safety of a predictable environment. He may instead find the flexibility and creativity to cope with a constantly changing world. Seven essentials for a managing process based on critical thinking skills are discussed.

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  7. A Vision for Congruency in Christian Education

    By Dr. Joe D Marlow — Pages 75-85

    The objective of Christian Education is congruency--a balance of thinking, feeling, and behaving in the lives of those who follow Christ. Congruency can therefore be described as the unifying theme of many Christina Education models and emphases that may initially seem dissimilar. The author provides a foundation for understanding congruency in several expressions of Christian Education.

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  8. The Ingredients of Effective Mentoring: The Log College as a Model for Mentorship

    By Gary E Schnittjer — Pages 86-100

    After failing to secure a teaching position at Yale, William Tennent Sr. founded one of the most successful educational enterprises in American history. Although Tennent attempted to pattern his academic ministry after the conventional models of his time, the Log College emerged with a distinctive ideology and methodology which spawned a lasting legacy. The author reveals how these ideological and methodological ingredients can become part of effective mentoring today.

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  9. Personality Traits Associated with Transformational Leadership Styles of Secondary Principals in Christian Schools

    By Dr. Craig D Koehler and Dr. Fred H Wallbrown and Dr. M William Konnert — Pages 101-109

    This study examined what personality traits of the California Psychological Inventory--Revised (Gough, 1988) were associated with transformational leadership factors of the Leadership Practices Inventory (Kouzes and Posner, 1988). The subjects included 25 randomly selected secondary principals from large midwestern Christian schools. Using a forward stepwise regression, the researcher observed eight CPI-R folk scales emerge as significant.

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  10. The Bad Old Days: A Comment on "What Can The Contemporary Church Learn?"

    By David W Brattston — Pages 110-117

    Relying on ante-Nicene sources, this article demonstrates that (1) the average early Christian was no more dedicated or loving than today, and (2) even in the earliest centuries church writers longed for a bygone hypothetical age of greater faithfulness among believers. The author cautions against basing reforms on the idealized past.

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  11. Research Notes

    By — Pages 118-128

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  12. Book Reviews

    By — Pages 129-139

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